Coeur d’Alene Tribe Interpretive Center

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37914 South Nukwalqw
Worley, ID
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The Homeland is still home. The place “where the old ones walked” includes almost 5,000,000 acres of what is now north Idaho, eastern Washington and western Montana. The “old ones” were extremely wealthy from an Indian perspective, with everything they needed close at hand. Unlike the tribes of the plains, the Coeur d’Alene’s and their neighbors, the Spokane’s, the Kootenai, the Kalispel, the bands of the Colville Confederated Tribes and the Kootenai-Salish, or Flatheads, were not nomadic. Coeur d’Alene Indian villages were established along the Coeur d’Alene, St. Joe, Clark Fork and Spokane Rivers. The homeland included numerous and permanent sites on the shores of Lake Coeur d’Alene, Lake Pend Orielle and Hayden Lake.

These tribes traded among themselves an with dozens of tribes far away on the Pacific coast. Ancient trade routes connected the Coeur d’Alene’s with the Nez Perce, the Shoshones and the Bannocks to the south and southeast. To the east were the tribes of the Great Plains and the vast herds of buffalo. With the coming of horses, young Coeur d’Alene men journeyed east to hunt buffalo. These journeys, however, were not necessary for survival. They were viewed as adventures, and even rites of passage, for youth who would emerge into manhood and into leadership roles.

http://www.cdatribe-nsn.gov/cultural/ancestral.aspx

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